MSPrecise™

Phase Clinical Validation Analytical Performance Commercialization
MSPrecise™ Multiple Sclerosis
Clinical Validation Phase completed
Analytical Performance Phase in progress
Commercialization Phase not started
LymPro Test® Alzheimer's Disease
Clinical Validation Phase completed
Analytical Performance Phase completed
Commercialization Phase in progress
Georgetown Assay1 Alzheimer's Disease - Exosomes
Clinical Validation Phase in progress
Analytical Performance Phase not started
Commercialization Phase not started
Georgetown Assay1 Alzheimer's Disease - Lipids
Clinical Validation Phase in progress
Analytical Performance Phase not started
Commercialization Phase not started
  1. Upon exercise of exclusive option with Georgetown University

MSPrecise™ is a proprietary next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) assay for the identification of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) at first clinical presentation. MSPrecise utilizes next-generation sequencing to measure DNA mutations found in rearranged immunoglobulin genes in immune cells initially isolated from cerebrospinal fluid. MSPrecise would augment the current standard of care for the diagnosis of MS by providing a more accurate assessment of a patient's immune response to a challenge within the central nervous system. This novel method of measuring changes in adaptive human immunity may also be able to discern individuals whose disease is more progressive and requires more aggressive treatment.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an auto-immune disorder that affects the central nervous system in which ones immune system attacks the protective myelin sheath that covers their nerves. Damage to the myelin disrupts communication between your brain and the rest of your body. Ultimately, the nerves themselves may deteriorate, a process that's currently irreversible. Symptoms of MS can vary depending on the amount of damage and which nerves are affected. Some people with severe MS may lose the ability to walk, while others experience long periods of remission during which they develop no new symptoms. Currently, there is no cure for MS, however treatment can help speed the recovery from attacks, modify the course of the disease and manage the symptoms.